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Study Finds Cannabis Dispensaries Reduce Opioid Deaths by 21%

Access to legal cannabis may help some patients avoid opioids altogether. Others may use cannabis to reduce opioid intake, or beat a dependency.

In a study published this week in the journal Economic Inquiry, researchers found that the legalization of adult-use cannabis reduced opioid overdose deaths by 21%. Researchers found that ‘recreational marijuana access significantly decreases opioid mortality.’

The study, carried out by economists at the University of Massachusetts and Colorado State University, found that legalization had “particularly pronounced effects for synthetic opioids” such as fentanyl.

Confirms Previous Studies

This week’s study backs up previous work on the question. A 2014 JAMA study found that states with medical marijuana laws saw 25% fewer deaths from opioid overdose compared to states without.

Last year two further studies found lower opioid prescription rates in legal states. A University of Kentucky researcher found a 6% lower rate of opioid prescriptions for pain in medical marijuana states, and a 12% lower opioid prescription rate in adult-use states. Meanwhile, researchers at the University of Georgia found that Medicare patients in medical marijuana states filled 14% fewer daily doses of opioids than patients in other states.

There were 47,600 deaths from opioids in the United States in 2017. A reduction of 21% would imply nearly 10,000 lives saved.

Three Ways Cannabis Can Help

The Economic Inquiry study does not suggest the exact mechanisms by which cannabis helps reduce opioid deaths. But in a 2017 interview with Leafly, Canadian researcher Philippe Lucas laid out three primary avenues for amelioration. Lucas suggested that pain patients might bypass the use of opioids altogether if physicians recommended trying medical cannabis first, rather than opioids first. If the cannabis provides sufficient relief, opioids would never need to come into the equation.

Second, cannabis may help patients using opioids to use fewer opioids or find more effective relief at lower dosage levels.

Third, cannabis may help those with an opioid dependency transition to replacement therapy with methadone.

The key, said Lucas, is a substitution effect that doesn’t have to be full and complete to be useful. Cannabis can be a therapeutic agent for some patients, and it can also act as a harm reduction agent for those who can’t completely stop their use of opioids. For those patients, cannabis may not be a complete substitute, but it may allow them to lower their opioid dosage and use and thereby stay alive.

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CannTrust, ‘leading’ medical cannabis provider, halts sales amid Health Canada probe

Leading medical cannabis provider halts sales amid Health Canada probe

There are several overlapping methods that can be broken into pieces with dried herbs.

“True” vaporization of dry herbs used by vaporizers. The process of putting dried herbs into the heating chamber.

Hot air is jetted through a chamber that absorbs all the psychotropic compounds of the dry herbs and produces a deliciously “steam”.

This process is called convection heating. Another form of true vaporization is conduction heating, which relies on the transfer of thermal energy through direct contact.

The last way to heat dry herbs is called burning heating. This happens when a heating element, also called a coil, comes in direct contact with the dried herbs, essentially wearing a picture.

Think of a vaporizer as behaving like a pipe in that it produces smoke. To learn more about the differences between the three heating methods, read the article Combustion vs Conduction vs Convection Vaping.

Some of the techniques available for burning dry herbs can be used for shattered.

Another type of vape coil used to break apart is a single rod quartz coil. This push-style vape coil has a funnel-style ceramic plate with a titanium coil wrapped around a quartz rod.


CannTrust, which describes itself as a “leading” provider of medical cannabis, has voluntarily halted all sales and shipments of its product after Health Canada found that it was growing cannabis in five unlicensed rooms and after the ministry received inaccurate information.

The company has also set up a special committee to investigate the matter.

CannTrust is doing this as a “precaution” as Health Canada investigates the company’s facility in Vaughan, Ont., a company release said Thursday.“CannTrust is working closely with the regulator through the review process and expects to provide further detail of the duration of the hold and other development as they become available,” the release added.

The moves come after the company said it had placed a hold on over 5,000 kg of dried cannabis that had been grown in unlicensed rooms at a facility in Pelham, Ont. between October 2018 and March 2019.

The company had applications for the rooms pending with Health Canada at the time.

CannTrust announced on Monday that it had placed a hold on approximately 7,500 kg of dried cannabis equivalent at its facility in Vaughan. That product had been produced in the unlicensed rooms in Pelham, CannTrust said.

The Ontario Cannabis Store announced Wednesday that it was pulling some of the company’s products from online sales, and from being shipped to brick-and-mortar stores, as Health Canada investigated.

Any customers who had ordered CannTrust product were eligible for refunds if the products were returned unopened within two weeks of delivery.

CannTrust serves over 72,000 medical patients with dried, extract and capsule products, it said in the release. The company operates a harvest facility in Pelham and a manufacturing facility in Vaughan.

 

 

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Canadian pot prices rise 17% after legalization

weed vape

Canadian pot prices rise 17% after legalization

 

Canadian first-mover cannabis advantage at risk from fast-growing U.S. firms

Canadian pot companies are beginning to face a growing threat from their southern neighbours. Bloomberg reports that the global advantage Canadian pot companies have enjoyed is on shaky ground given domestic sales limitations and exclusion from the huge potential of the U.S. market, as some U.S. multi-state operators begin to gain ground.

That means Canadian licensed producers risk missing out on a market that’s estimated to be worth US$22 billion in legal spending by 2022. Canadian sales are forecast to reach US$3.8 billion by then.

Meanwhile, several Canadian firms have established international operations in Europe and South America, but that isn’t really a substitute for U.S. growth, according to one leading cannabis investment banker tells Bloomberg.

Aurora boosts the size of Alberta pot production facility by one-third

Aurora Cannabis may soon have the biggest pot production facility in the world. The company said Wednesday it is boosting the size of its Medicine Hat, Alta. high-tech Aurora Sun facility by one-third to 1.62 million square feet as the firm seeks to ramp up production amid growing global demand for medical cannabis.

The increased size would boost production to more than 230,000 kilograms of cannabis per year, Aurora said, adding it expects Aurora Sun to complete construction by the end of the year.

The average cost of a gram of Canadian pot up by 17 per cent: Statscan

A crowd-sourced survey compiled by Statistics Canada found that the cost of a legal gram of cannabis in Canada appears to be rising as illegal cannabis prices drop.

The data, which was compiled using 1,129 new submissions, 936 of which passed the editing and screening process, found that the average cost of dried cannabis has gone up by more than 17 per cent since legalization.

Canada’s national statistics agency said the unweighted average price per gram of dried cannabis from both legal and illegal sources combined was $8.04 post-legalization.

That legal price, which includes online and in-store purchases, amounts to approximately 17.3 per cent more than the pre-Oct. 17 price of $6.85 which included black market and medical marijuana pricing.

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/cannabis-canada-daily-canadian-pot-prices-rise-17-after-legalization-1.1242607